Are superhero gadgets our future lifesavers?

Think about Iron Man’s exoskeleton suit, Hawkeye’s super eyesight, or even Colossus with organic steel skin. Innovative ideas, and someday, thanks to science, they might become reality. But how realistic are these inventions? And how will they be used: for good, or for bad?

key notes

Dr. Barry Fitzgerald

Science communicator at TU Eindhoven / Superhero scientist

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