Wijzig cookie instellingen

Why do (some) people enjoy violence?

In the war against ISIS, men in Iraq volunteer to fight in militant groups. Why do they join? And why do they stay commited? Cultural Anthropologist Younes Saramifar (VU Amsterdam) explains that taking pleasure in violence is part of the answer.

key notes

Dr. Younes Saramifar

Dr. Younes Saramifar is a cultural anthropologist at VU Amsterdam

Next video:

Ben jij verantwoordelijk voor je daden als je dronken bent?

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Watch this video
arrow_forward
How can science read your mind?

How cool would it be to read minds? Of course that's not possible. Or is it? Social psychologist Rima-Maria Rahal (Tilburg University) explains how science might have an answer.

How can we build a computer that thinks like a brain?

Brains and computers are two different things. Computers are way better at complicated calculations, but they can't reason like humans. What if we could design a material that can actually think like a brain? Physicist Alexander Khajetoorians (Radboud University) tries to do exactly that.

Why do (some) people enjoy violence?

In the war against ISIS, men in Iraq volunteer to fight in militant groups. Why do they join? And why do they stay commited? Cultural Anthropologist Younes Saramifar (VU Amsterdam) explains that taking pleasure in violence is part of the answer.

Why do you get angry when you are treated unfairly?

When somebody screws you over, you probably get mad about the injustice. Dr. Alan Sanfey (Radboud University) explains how you make different decisions when you feel treated unfairly.

How are hair dryers and headphones killing your ears?

Hearing loss isn't something that just concerns your grandma. Your ears have to endure a lot: loud music, but also everyday noises like traffic and hair dryers. Neuroscientist Sonja Pyott (University of Groningen) explains how noise damages your ears.

Possible due to

With the support of