Would you eat lab-grown meat?

Burgers without animal suffering? It might be possible soon. And no, we’re not talking about vegetarian meat substitutes. As Mark Post (Maastricht University) explains in this lecture, lab-grown meat could be the answer when it comes to reducing our impact on the environment, while still allowing us to eat meat.

key notes

prof. dr. Mark Post

Mark Post is als hoogleraar vasculaire fysiologie verbonden aan de Universiteit Maastricht, maar de meeste mensen kennen hem als de vleesprofessor. In 2013 is professor Post wereldnieuws als hij de eerste hamburger van kweekvlees presenteert.

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